How to Set Troop Goals for the New Year

This post may contain affiliate links and this site is not connected with, affiliated with, approved by, endorsed by The Girl Scouts of the USA or the Frontier Girls. Ideas are my own and I share to help you run your troops with ease.

As the year concludes and you enter a new world of possibilities, it’s important to self-reflect on how the year has gone, and do some soul searching on strategies to improve your scouts’ experience in the program. With a new year on the horizon, there are so many ways to make this year better than ever before! Goal-setting can make a huge difference as you strive to support Girl Scouts and troop volunteers.

If you’ve never sat down and done some intentional, concrete goal-setting for your troop before, now is the time to give it a shot! Trust me, your girls can sense the difference between a well-prepared, purposeful leader and one who is just scraping by. If you don’t know where to start, don’t worry! I’ve compiled a list of customized goal-setting questions that any troop leader can use to set goals.

Goal-Setting Questionnaire:

  1. What went well this year? What could have gone better? What new things should we bring into our scouting this year?
  2. I want my scouts to think of me as (adjective), (adjective), and (adjective). In what ways am I meeting these expectations, and how could I embody those ideals more?
  3. What forms of support did I have while leading this troop this past year? Do I have the support I need to lead to the best of my ability? What new forms of support could be helpful to me?
  4. What is my style of leadership, and what strengths are included in that style? What are some of the weaknesses of my leadership style? How can I work with it to make next year a better troop year?
  5. What new skills could I develop that would help my scouts feel more supported?
  6. How did our cookie orders compare to our goals, and how can we make next year like this year or better when it comes to booth sales?
  7. What are some of my short-term goals for our troop, and what are some of my long-term goals?
  8. What are some ways I’ve made our troop a safe place for scouts, and how can I make it even safer?
  9. How have I accommodated students with varying needs, and how can I improve those services going forward?
  10. Are there a service project we could try with any community organizations or religious organizations my girls might like to partner with that we haven’t tried yet?
  11. What are some of my girls’ interests that we haven’t gotten to explore yet?
  12. Are there any adjustments we need to make in our troop budget going forward?
  13. What areas could I use a fresh start in, and how will I achieve that fresh start?
  14. How has the number of girls in my troop changed over the years, and how can I make plans that are better suited for the group we have now?
  15. What Girl Scout levels have my girls reached so far, and what can I do to motivate them to make quick process on the next levels?
  16. What troop activities do we usually incorporate throughout the year, and are the girls satisfied with those activities?
  17. What specific topics do my scouts need help with: financial literacy, life skills, the Girl Scout cookie program, or other areas of interest?
  18. Is there any way we could use troop funds in a better way this year than we have previously?

A great way to bring these goals to life is to sit down with a pen and paper or your laptop, select the questions that resonate with you the most, and write down all of your answers with honesty. You can use the answers to these template questions to set specific short-term and long-term goals that you can start putting into action today.

Tools From My Site

A lot of Girl Scout troop leaders’ goal-setting is centered around organization, or would at least be assisted by increased structure. One of the best ways to put your goal setting in action is to use organizational tools that will help you feel put together. I have so many resources available on my site that can help you create organized troop plans.

I know that coming up with your own activities, organizational tools, and patch ideas can be tough, especially if you’re a new troop leader. That’s why I’ve created this community! Once you start implementing my ideas and tools, you will see a drastic change in your troop meetings. You can also join our Facebook group to get support from other leaders.

Garden Fairy Adventure Kit

A family of 10 garden fairies are on a mission to teach your girls good values to live by.  Your girls will go on a garden adventure helping their fairy friends plant their flowers, water their gardens, and learn how to put their values into action one activity at a time. Everything is planned for you, just gather the supplies and enjoy running your meeting. Learn more and get yours today.

Being a scout leader doesn’t have to be difficult, but it does take work to succeed. If you invest yourself in goal-setting and make sure all your adult volunteers are on the same page, the coming year of scouts can be your best year yet!

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Enjoy every minute being a leader and continue to inspire your girls!

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My name is Jodi Carlson, I am a mom, wife, & web designer and come with 25 years of GS experience. I am now sharing my experiences and helping other Girl leaders be great and successful and shape today’s girls to be the leaders of tomorrow. I was blessed with a Son in March of 2015 and stepped down as a full time girl leader, but missed planning and volunteering, so I decided after 25 years I have so many ideas to inspire girls and help leaders so I choose to build this blog and it has grown into a resource beyond GS, I am reaching girl leaders in many organizations.